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‘No Demo Reno’ Highlights Upgrades Anyone Can Do Fast—Even for Free

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Wish you could renovate your house, only without squandering tons of time or money? “No Demo Reno” will show you the way.

Now in its second season, this HGTV show stars home renovation expert Jenn Todryk helping homeowners in the Dallas–Fort Worth area create whole-home transformations that take mere weeks and don’t cost an arm and a leg.

“No demo reno is totally the way to go,” says Todryk. “You’ll fall in love with your own house all over again, but without the sweat and money involved in a total renovation. Leave the sledgehammer in the garage.”

In the episode “Reno Rescue,” Todryk shows us not one, but two remarkable renovations, one for Erin and Jason, who are expecting a baby and have $50,000 to spend on a renovation that must be completed in three weeks.

The other is for Daryl and Tracy, who have recently blended their families, have two boys, and must renovate Daryl’s home in a matter of just two weeks on a $60,000 budget.

As the clock ticks, we see the amazing work that can be completed quickly without the long wait for permits or materials. In fact, some of these changes can be done in a weekend tops, and could work wonders for your abode, too.

Paint red brick white for a more modern look

Older, red brick house
Older, red brick house

HGTV

To give a “huge lift” to the exterior without spending a lot of money, Todryk advises spray-painting those dark red bricks white, and painting the window frames black for a more modern look. They also add shutters to distinguish it from all the other houses in the area. Once done, the house looks great, proving that it doesn’t take much to give an old house a new look.

Red exterior bricks painted white
Red exterior bricks painted white

HGTV

Reuse cabinets and countertops

Redesigned family room
Those storage cabinets under the TV? They used to be in the kitchen.

HGTV

Todryk, ever resourceful, needs to remove some of the cabinetry and granite countertops from the kitchen and wet bar. But those materials are beautiful and really well-made—it would be a shame to throw them away.

So Todryk cleverly repurposes them for the den/family room, where toys are currently strewed about all over the floor.

“The No. 1 priority is storage,” she says.

Once painted and decked out with new hardware, those kitchen cabinets look like they were made for the family room. They also provide much-needed storage space and save the family thousands.

Change features you don’t use so they’re practical for you

Old, useless wet bar
Old, useless wet bar

HGTV

Speaking of the wet bar, it spans the dining area and has a massive wine storage space and a sink. Erin and Jason never use any part of that space, so Todryk decides to make it more useful without tearing it down.

To do this, she puts a new counter on top of the wet bar that covers the sink. She also removes the cabinets and wine storage above, and replaces them with open shelving, where family photos can be displayed.

Now it’s more of a buffet and it isn’t far from the door.

“Whenever you go shopping, you have tons of stuff in your hands. You can put it here and sort through it later,” says Todryk. This makes it far more practical.

New dry bar
New dry bar

HGTV

Replace the tub with a larger shower

Expanded spa shower where jetted tub used to be
Expanded spa shower where a jetted tub used to be

HGTV

Many primary suites have large, elaborate tubs, which are hardly ever used. Neither couple has any use for their jetted tub, so Todryk encourages the couples to remove (and sell) those tubs, and expand the showers, which are currently the size of a creepy closet or phone booth.

Post-makeover, the showers are beautiful and worth spending time in. The families are elated!

Reduce the size of the bed to expand the primary suite

Massive bed
Massive bed

HGTV

Erin and Jason have a good-sized bedroom that is completely overwhelmed by a massive king-sized bed. What makes it even more imposing is the frame, which has huge, chunky posts in the four corners, adding at least a foot on either side of the bed.

Ideally, the owners would downsize to a queen-sized bed for more space. But if you’re the type of person who likes to stretch out when you sleep, a king is still doable—just ditch the gigantic frame for a roomier room.

Main bedroom with queen-sized bed
Main bedroom with a queen-sized bed

HGTV

The trendy way to display books

Displaying books, pages out
Displaying books, pages out

HGTV

Remember when designers scoured used-book stores to find hardbacks with bright covers to accent the colors of the room? Regardless of the title, they’d display them with the spines out so the colors would match.

Apparently, that’s not happening anymore, according to Todryk. She advises “when decorating to fill in blank spaces, turn the books around so you can’t see the spines. Because who wants underwater basket weaving on their shelf? Not me!”

She shows how to display the books page side out as a design element, and how to place them standing up and lying down. Then, “pop a fake plant on it for a pop of color and you’re done,” she says.

The post ‘No Demo Reno’ Highlights Upgrades Anyone Can Do Fast—Even for Free appeared first on Real Estate News & Insights | realtor.com®.

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